All posts by fhsfalconer

The website of Fauquier High School's student newspaper, the Falconer. 100% student run.

Mika Wilkening Experiences Life at FHS

As you walk the halls you might notice some outstanding accents and faces. Fauquier  welcomed many foreign exchange students this school year. Some students staying for a couple weeks while some complete the year her, among them Mika Wilkening.

As you walk the halls you might notice some outstanding accents and faces. Fauquier  welcomed many foreign exchange students this school year. Some students staying for a couple weeks while some complete the year her, among them Mika Wilkening.

Wilkening came from Berlin, Germany to complete his senior year. Once he settled into the new country he noticed a great amount of differences between here and his hometown, “I really like the people,” said Wilkening. “If you compare them to Germany they’re really tolerant here.” He described the people here as more open towards the actions and preferences of others rather than in Germany. For example, Wilkening said “dye[ing] your hair or walk[ing] around with weird clothes and in Germany you won’t see that.”

Another difference is the block schedule. “The school system in Germany is like, here each semester you have 4 classes, in Germany you have like 30.” Wilkening added although it’s not 30 classes everyday, they rotate classes each day.

When asked to describe Virginia in one word he said, “unexciting.” The main reason being the difference in population. “I live in a big city and here you don’t have things to do,” said Wilkening

The food also being a great difference. “Here you eat more fast food and stuff,” said Wilkening. In Berlin, the people eat healthier and less fast food.

An interesting fact not many know is Wilkening has a twin sister also in the foreign exchange program. She does not go to Fauquier, but Culpeper.

With the arrival of Wilkening, the students were eager to meet the foreign exchange student. “He’s a great friend,” said freshman Ethan Polster. “He’s always there if you need something.” The foreign exchange program gives the students an opportunity to meet new people you wouldn’t encounter on a daily basis. As Fauquier continues to welcome students from around the world, the students and staff will have the chance to learn about different cultures and arts.

Wilkening came from Berlin, Germany to complete his senior year. Once he settled into the new country he noticed a great amount of differences between here and his hometown, “I really like the people,” said Wilkening. “If you compare them to Germany they’re really tolerant here.” He described the people here as more open towards the actions and preferences of others rather than in Germany. For example, Wilkening said “dye[ing] your hair or walk[ing] around with weird clothes and in Germany you won’t see that.”

Another difference is the block schedule. “The school system in Germany is like, here each semester you have 4 classes, in Germany you have like 30.” Wilkening added although it’s not 30 classes everyday, they rotate classes each day.

When asked to describe Virginia in one word he said, “unexciting.” The main reason being the difference in population. “I live in a big city and here you don’t have things to do,” said Wilkening

The food also being a great difference. “Here you eat more fast food and stuff,” said Wilkening. In Berlin, the people eat healthier and less fast food.

An interesting fact not many know is Wilkening has a twin sister also in the foreign exchange program. She does not go to Fauquier, but Culpeper.

With the arrival of Wilkening, the students were eager to meet the foreign exchange student. “He’s a great friend,” said freshman Ethan Polster. “He’s always there if you need something.” The foreign exchange program gives the students an opportunity to meet new people you wouldn’t encounter on a daily basis. As Fauquier continues to welcome students from around the world, the students and staff will have the chance to learn about different cultures and arts.

By Amanda Arellano-Staff Reporter

Advertisements

Fashion Spotlight

Rachel Wait

Sophomore

Q: How would you describe your style?

A: “I think it’s like going back to the nice ol’ ‘90s. It grew a lot in eighth grade, just lot’s of thrift shopping.”

Q: Where do you shop?

A: “Brandy Melville, the Salvation Army, and the Goodwill in Manassas”

Q: What’s a trend that you incorporate in your style?

A: “Recently a lot of people [are] going back [in] time to like the ‘90s or/and ‘80s. [That] has really influenced me, I really like how everything has a vintage feel to it.”

Q: Who is your fashion inspiration?

A: “Jennifer Aniston, definitely”

Q: What’s your staple outfit?

A: “Mom jeans, ankle socks, Dr. Martens, and a cropped shirt”

Humans of Fauquier

I have autism, so basically, it’s harder for me to communicate with other people and other people don’t really know about it so it’s hard. It’s hard socially and in school settings, it’s like stressful. Usually, people who are quiet like me are easier to talk to. Asking for help from teachers is hard and making friends obviously. It feels like anxiety overload.

Artist of the Month

Eye-catching art and intricate detail in Gillian Fanning’s artwork exhibits creativity and distinction. The Falcon’s Artist of the Month recognition goes to Gillian Fanning nominated by the art department. She has been interested in art ever since the beginning of high school. Fanning is currently enrolled in functional art II with art teacher Charlene Root. “Mrs. Root is the best, I love having her as my art teacher,” Fanning said. “I like that in the class, it’s more arts and crafts than pressured drawing. We have a basic project, but you can do whatever you want with your project and you [be] really creative with how you do it.”

Root has many good things to say about the young artist. “She is an extremely meticulous crafter,” Root said. “Her work always shows great attention to detail, well thought-out ideas, and superb craftsmanship.” She enjoys having Fanning in the class and is always excited to see her work when she finishes.

Wasteland, Baby! Provides Emotion

After an almost five-year hiatus, Irish singer-songwriter Hozier released his second album Wasteland, Baby! on March 1. Many know him from his successful debut, “Take Me to Church,” which hit No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100. Although his newest album is a small step down from his debut album Hozier, and an obvious hit chaser, his distinctive voice sets a high bar and it’s truly an album listeners can get lost in.

Before the drop of his album, he gave fans a few sneak previews. “Nina Cried Power (feat. Mavis Staples)” was by far my favorite. In this song, Hozier gives homage to artists who have helped shape rock ‘n roll, artists such as Nina Simone, Joni Mitchell, Billie Holliday, James Brown, and Mavis Staples, who was featured in the song. Mavis Staples’ voice paired with Hozier’s resulted in lush harmonies and a rich blues-rock sound. Hozier has been known to use meaningful lyrics and in this song, he clearly demonstrates that. Lyrics such as, “And I could cry power/ power has been cried by those stronger than me/ straight into the face that tells you to rattle your chains/ if you love bein’ free,” highlight the central meaning of the song and the struggles suffered by those who shaped blues and gospel music during the Civil Rights Era.  

I must admit that there were a few songs in the album I just could not get into. I could tell he was trying too hard to make another hit and it spoiled the album. A clear example is “To Noise Making (Sing),” which is probably my least favorite song from him. It has a good message–the power of singing regardless of talent–yet it feels empty. It just sounds like he just wanted to make an indie song to clap to or play in the background of a coffee shop. Regardless, there are many songs that I could never get sick of if I were to play them on repeat. Hozier has such a profound voice and sound it’s hard to absolutely hate any of his music. “Wasteland, Baby!” is the perfect album to play when you just need a little inspiration and soul in your life.

By Nayei Arellano-Sports Editor

Captain Marvel Is Neither the best nor the Worst

As the Marvel Cinematic Universe continues deeper into the lore of its comic book origins, it would seem apparent that superhero movie fatigue would set in. It only took the DC Universe three films for viewers to get sick of its characters, but the MCU is miraculously still thriving with every entry it churns out, with many more on the way. The newest flick is Captain Marvel, which marks the first female-led solo superhero movie for Marvel. DC already threw their hat into the ring with the massively successful but hollow and safe Wonder Woman, and after the disappointment of that film, I had my doubts going into Captain Marvel.

Brie Larson (Room, Scott Pilgrim vs. the World) takes on Carol Danvers–a woman with a complicated past who finds herself caught in a war between the shape-shifting Skrulls and the Kree. She must fight the Skrulls, figure out the murky details of her past, and save planet Earth while also gaining the confidence to be the warrior she is destined to be. Along the way, she finds young Nick Fury (a movie-stealing Samuel L. Jackson) and must figure out who to trust, for the Skrulls can shape-shift into anybody she assumes she can trust.

Captain Marvel breaks itself up into three sections: the space-epic the first twenty minutes promise, the buddy-cop action film which the bulk of the film is made up of, and the typical Earth-saving superhero movie of the last thirty minutes. Of these three, the best is easily the second, in which Samuel L. Jackson gives his best Nick Fury performance yet and the best moments of the film are contained. Jackson is the glue that holds the film together, and without him the majority of the humor would have fallen flat. While others gave fun and sometimes emotional performances, I always looked forward to the moments in which Jackson bantered with the other characters. In fact, the quality of the film exponentially increases when he first appears on-screen outside of a Blockbuster Video while investigating a supposedly routine case.

Others give quality performances, such as Jude Law as the protagonist’s former mentor and Ben Mendelsohn as the leader of the Skrulls. However, the standout supporting character is Lashana Lynch as Danvers’ friend from her complicated past, who shocked me with the most emotional and subtly-acted scene in the film. I haven’t seen her in anything thus far, and I hope to catch a glimpse of her in the future–preferably with better writing.

Unfortunately, the weakest link in this film when it comes to acting is Larson herself. I don’t believe she performed badly, especially when I have seen her be so radiant in other films. For the first half of the film, her character is kept at a distance from the audience, which creates confusion when it comes to the feelings they should be exerting towards her. Luckily, the second half clears some of the confusion that the first half establishes, but the feeling of connection with Carol Danvers’ emotions never comes flooding in, and I never felt that I got a glimpse into what she was thinking at a certain moment. The reason supporting characters like Nick Fury steal the show is due to the lack of understanding we have of Danvers’ inner workings. This makes it that much harder to empower her and to send a strong message, even though the writers still succeed in doing so by the end of the movie.

By far the biggest issue I have with Captain Marvel is the pacing. The directors, Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck, never seemed to be able to hold a scene for the correct amount of time so the audience could embrace the full impact. In the first third, when the film introduces Captain Marvel’s life on the Kree planet, the audience isn’t given enough time to fully understand the impact it has on her disposition. Because of this, when certain plot elements are introduced later in the film, it was hard for me to grasp how profoundly these events mattered to her personal life. On the flip side, the third act of the film seems to hold each scene about thirty seconds too long: just enough that the audience gets tired of the point that the writers reiterate. If the time spent on these useless and long scenes had been spent on developing the essential storylines near the beginning, then we’d have gotten a better film that trusts the audience instead of spoon-feeding them the morals and themes. That being said, Captain Marvel is an unabashedly fun movie that will give the majority of viewers what they want. While plot stereotypes are included, character stereotypes are avoided by the writers. Diversity is spread throughout the story; the movie satisfies both those who want to see Captain Marvel as an empowered and unique female character, and those who want an entertaining superhero movie without any overt political opinions included. While Captain Marvel is nowhere near the best the MCU has to offer, it is also far from the worst–this is especially astonishing given that this is the twenty-first film in the ever-continuing saga. Before every Marvel movie, I always think it is finally time for fatigue to start setting in when it comes to superhero movies, and I am wrong nearly every time. While I do wish more time had been spent in editing the film to perfection instead of adhering to the typical chichés, it can’t be denied that Captain Marvel is escapism entertainment at its finest, which is all this movie needed to be while audiences wait for Avengers: Endgame to hit theaters.

By Joel Alexander-Student Life Editor

How to Train Your Dragon’s Nostalgic Final Trilogy

The dragon fantasy PG-rated movie, How To Train Your Dragon, made the third movie to the twelve-book series that is based on. They are about a boy named Hiccup, whose family and village are the center of everything when it comes to hunting down the dragons.

The two allies must work together to save their world’s from being destroyed by their enemies. As he and his village grows with more dragons, their land gets crowded and they become a greater target for their enemies. They always have a plan to escape from what situation they get into and they come up with a backup plan when it’s needed the most.

Hiccup becomes to be the leader of his village when his the time comes and he realizes that Toothless, his dragon, also needs a partner as he already has one. He also leans to let go when time comes and Hiccup only wants what is the best for his scaley retiled best friend.

They didn’t put The Hidden World in the title for nothing. Hiccup played by Jay Baruchel and his partner Astrid played by America Ferrara go to find Toothless when he was not returning home and they fly into a waterfall. They find countless different dragons that they never discovered before and they soon see Toothless with a white light fury, who becomes to be his mate that he always wanted and finally found.  

A great series can’t end without fighting the antagonist and having an ending that will surely make this trilogy the greatest to those dragon lovers.

Many people say that books are always better than movies, and sometimes they can be right about that. The book series has been around since the early 2000s and it has gained a great amount of popularity since its first release by Cressida Cowell. This PG-rated film brings back those memories that you have from being a young child and liking the fantasy world. If you watch all three movies together, then you might be able to see how each character has changed since the beginning and their true colors will show. I recommend this movie and the other two to anyone who wants to feel like a child again and wants to feel like how it once was when they were five years old again. This movie might even have you believe in things that you may once believe in at the end and bring your younger sibling, so that they may too also enjoy that moment of cherishing of time traveling of being a child again.

By Yohali Arias-Martinz