Is Parent Hovering Helpful or Harmful

PRO

Throughout history, society has developed many different styles of parenting, one of the most controversial being helicopter parenting. Merriam-Webster defines a helicopter parent as “a parent who is overly involved in the life of his or her child.” Helicopter parents are often given a bad rap in society. While this is understandable, it’s also  slightly unfair when you look past the surface.

Do you ever wonder why your parents are always hovering over your shoulder? It may be annoying, but  many kids need to realize that their parents love them and just want to protect them. Every good parent wants the best for their child, and  may express this feeling in different ways . Helicopter parents usually have good intentions, even if they seem over-controlling.

Many benefits can come out of helicopter parenting. For one, helicopter parents are always around and trying to be part of their child’s lives. This gives the child a support system that they can always rely on. Parents who aren’t always there  can leave their children feeling alone and unwanted. For example, there’s a recurring movie cliche in which wealthy parents spend no time with their child, leaving the child to resort to bad deeds to get their attention. On the other side, there’s another family with stricter parents that may annoy the kids at times, but the kids are happier because their parents are around, caring for them.

Helicopter parents also keep their child in check. Without  strict parents making sure their kids are behaving themselves, there would be a bunch of immature, chaotic kids running through the streets. Parents that let their children do whatever they want are not raising model citizens, and if their child continues to think they can get away with anything, they will carry this attitude into their adulthood.

Helicopter parents are often known to force their children to participate in multiple  activities as well as require the child to perform well in school. While this may seem harsh at the moment, it is really beneficial to the child’s future.

In regards to participating in activities, it gives the child the opportunity to gain different skills and experiences. A free environment is created in which they can  fail and learn from these failures. Meanwhile, children who are not introduced to these things will stay in a little bubble called their comfort zone; they often won’t do things they think they’ll be bad at or dislike and therefore, never have any true learning experiences.

Enforcing good school performance also benefits the child as it provides an open, more promising future . If the child is slacking in school and their parents aren’t watching , their attitude towards work will only worsen, giving them a hard time to get into college let alone find a job. In the short-term, the constant nagging about good grades may be tough but the future is bright and helicopter parents know this.

Many disagree with this viewpoint, saying that parents who always control their kids’ lives take away a child’s independence and ability to choose for themselves. All these are valid points that can be found true and I won’t deny that. Yet, kids are kids and their brains are still developing.They need some sort of guidance in making decisions because they won’t always make wise ones. They can learn from what their parents have taught them, and if they want to change their beliefs once they have the opportunity, they can. Helicopter parents aren’t going to always be on your back, usually, they are just trying to fly you down a safe path.

Situations with helicopter parents vary from person to person. Helicopter parents have their benefits but there are some situations in which they can be too extreme. I believe it is important for a parent to be strict to an extent at which the child is not turning into a crazy monkey, jumping through trees. That level of discipline will label the parent as a helicopter parent, but I don’t see anything wrong with that as long as the discipline is kept at a reasonable level. The most important thing is that the child is safe and happy.

By Rachel Singleton-News Editor

CON

Throughout history, society has developed many different styles of parenting, one of the most controversial being helicopter parenting. Merriam-Webster defines a helicopter parent as “a parent who is overly involved in the life of his or her child.” Helicopter parents are often given a bad rap in society. While this is understandable, it’s also  slightly unfair when you look past the surface.

Do you ever wonder why your parents are always hovering over your shoulder? It may be annoying, but  many kids need to realize that their parents love them and just want to protect them. Every good parent wants the best for their child, and  may express this feeling in different ways . Helicopter parents usually have good intentions, even if they seem over-controlling.

Many benefits can come out of helicopter parenting. For one, helicopter parents are always around and trying to be part of their child’s lives. This gives the child a support system that they can always rely on. Parents who aren’t always there  can leave their children feeling alone and unwanted. For example, there’s a recurring movie cliche in which wealthy parents spend no time with their child, leaving the child to resort to bad deeds to get their attention. On the other side, there’s another family with stricter parents that may annoy the kids at times, but the kids are happier because their parents are around, caring for them.

Helicopter parents also keep their child in check. Without  strict parents making sure their kids are behaving themselves, there would be a bunch of immature, chaotic kids running through the streets. Parents that let their children do whatever they want are not raising model citizens, and if their child continues to think they can get away with anything, they will carry this attitude into their adulthood.

Helicopter parents are often known to force their children to participate in multiple  activities as well as require the child to perform well in school. While this may seem harsh at the moment, it is really beneficial to the child’s future.

In regards to participating in activities, it gives the child the opportunity to gain different skills and experiences. A free environment is created in which they can  fail and learn from these failures. Meanwhile, children who are not introduced to these things will stay in a little bubble called their comfort zone; they often won’t do things they think they’ll be bad at or dislike and therefore, never have any true learning experiences.

Enforcing good school performance also benefits the child as it provides an open, more promising future . If the child is slacking in school and their parents aren’t watching , their attitude towards work will only worsen, giving them a hard time to get into college let alone find a job. In the short-term, the constant nagging about good grades may be tough but the future is bright and helicopter parents know this.

Many disagree with this viewpoint, saying that parents who always control their kids’ lives take away a child’s independence and ability to choose for themselves. All these are valid points that can be found true and I won’t deny that. Yet, kids are kids and their brains are still developing.They need some sort of guidance in making decisions because they won’t always make wise ones. They can learn from what their parents have taught them, and if they want to change their beliefs once they have the opportunity, they can. Helicopter parents aren’t going to always be on your back, usually, they are just trying to fly you down a safe path.

Situations with helicopter parents vary from person to person. Helicopter parents have their benefits but there are some situations in which they can be too extreme. I believe it is important for a parent to be strict to an extent at which the child is not turning into a crazy monkey, jumping through trees. That level of discipline will label the parent as a helicopter parent, but I don’t see anything wrong with that as long as the discipline is kept at a reasonable level. The most important thing is that the child is safe and happy.

By Catherine Smith-Staff Reporter

Advertisements

Leave a Comment!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s